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Childcare Injuries- What Should I Do?

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The joy of having a baby cannot be overstated. The toddler years are a potentially dangerous time for a wobbly child and parents who spend a good deal of their time childproofing the house from stair gates to little plastic plugs pushed into electric outlets.

NEGLIGENT SUPERVISION

In many homes childcare is critical, and total strangers have the legal duty to protect their children from injuries.   The best approach is to examine the child care facility from every perspective.  The childcare facilities goal is to avoid a legal negligence supervision claim which can be detrimental to the health of your child and the survival of the facility.  Negligence is not just an accident but is behavior that a reasonable person would not do.  Intentional harms to your child will threaten the facilities license, require a suspension and investigation and may have criminal consequences.

INFORMATION  THAT PARENTS SHOULD KNOW

1.  What is the staff-to-child ratio?
2.  Do you know the qualifications of the staff and can review
Staff training and employment records?
3.  Is the food as nutritious as claimed?
4.  Is the facility peanut-free as advertised?
5.  Are the children honestly allowed to spend time outside,
even if weather permits?
6.  Is the television constantly on?
7.  Are you permitted to make reasonable unscheduled visits?
8.  Do you approve of disciplinary techniques?
9.   Do the daycare staff communicate with you about your
child?
10. Will you be able to receive any disciplinary reports made
against the facility and the number and severity of child injuries?
11.  Is there a policy and procedures to prevent injuries?

PREVENTING INJURIES -MINIMUM STANDARDS

1. Children cannot reach and sharp objects and toys easily
broken.
2. Cleaning products and medication should be in a locked  box
3.  Small swallowable toys should not be allowed in the facility.
4.  Stairs should have gates and doors locked.
5.  Children continuously supervised, and a roll call should be
regularly taken.
6.  All shelving should be firmly affixed to the walls.
7.  Inside toys and outside play structures should be solid and
safe with at least 6 to 12 inches of outside ground cover
such as shredded/recycled rubber and wood chips mulch.

With any possible litigation because of an injured child, to avoid injuries, there are established standards that daycare facilities must follow.